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150 Years Ago This Week: It is finished

When CSS Shenandoah set sail for Liverpool on Aug. 2, 1865 after the crew learned from the British ship Barracouta that the war had ended months earlier and that the Confederacy had collapsed, the North and South were still settling…
150 Years Ago This Week: The last flag down

As August 1865 began, the country, north and south, was still coming to grips with four intense years of bloody warfare. Out in the vast Pacific Ocean, the Confederate raider CSS Shenandoah cruised south, unaware that the war had ended…
150 Years Ago This Week: Straight out to sea

After waiting nearly three weeks to learn where their sentences for complicity in the assassination of Abraham Lincoln were to be served, Samuel Mudd, Edman Spangler, Michael O’Laughlen and Samuel Arnold were taken to a ship and there learned their…
150 Years Ago This Week: Waiting . . .

July 1865 Of the cast which Abraham Lincoln’s assassin had so hopefully assembled in Washington for the roles he had assigned in the crime, five of them, including himself, were now dead on July 9. Booth, the star-tragedian of the…
150 Years Ago This Week: The last organized surrender

June 1865 On Wednesday, June 21, President Andrew Johnson appointed Lewis E. Parsons as provisional governor of Alabama; this was in keeping with the president’s policy of appointing provisional governors in the former Confederate States before the Radicals in the…
150 Years Ago This Week: The Grand Review

May 1865 On Saturday, May 20, near Longwood, Missouri, Federal troops got into a firefight with Confederate guerrillas on the Blackwater River. This kind of engagement was common as news of the Confederate surrenders spread around the country. President Andrew…

May 1865 On Friday, May 12, in far southern Texas, some 500 Union troops under command of Col. Theodore Barrett marched inland from Brazos Santiago (now Matamoros), towards Brownsville. Some 300 Confederate troops under Col. John “Rip” Ford were encamped at Palmito Ranch…

May 1865 After the surrender of Lt. Gen. Richard Taylor and his Confederate army in Alabama and Mississippi on Thursday, May 4, there remained only Confederate troops under Gen. Kirby Smith in the Trans-Mississippi; Brig. Gen. Jeff Thompson’s troops in…

On Saturday, April 29, President Andrew Johnson removed trade restrictions in former Confederate states east of the Mississippi River, within military lines. President Jefferson Davis and the remainder of the Confederate cabinet continued their movement to the south.