History

150 Years Ago This Week: A tragic time in the Southland

February 1865 When Columbia, S.C., was being destroyed in mid-February, the City of Charleston was evacuated by Lt. Gen. William Hardee and his Confederate troops. Charleston had been the birthplace of secession and a spiritual capital of the entire South. Its defenders were in danger of being penned in, and Gen. Hardee reluctantly and belatedly pulled...
Read More »

Down Memory Lane for Feb. 26

By
0
Feb. 26

Feb. 6, 1975 Delegate D. French Slaughter Jr. has announced the appointment of Douglas K. Baumgardner of Washington as his administrative assistant for the current session of the General Assembly. Baumgardner, a 1973 graduate of Virginia Military Institute and a second year law student at the University of Virginia, will be employed by Slaughter on a...
Read More »

Presidential summit

By Raymond Boc

Down Memory Lane for Feb. 19

By
0
Feb. 19

Jan. 16, 1975 When trustees of the Rappahannock Library assume charge of the Helen Fuller estate in March, they will receive less than half of what they had originally expected. Receipts from a public auction of Miss Fuller’s personal belongings amounted to $28,000 in October of 1972, when the sale was held. But that was...
Read More »

150 Years Ago This Week: The destruction of Columbia

On Friday, Feb. 17, the Federals captured Columbia; Mayor Thomas Goodwyn and a delegation of officials rode out in carriages to meet the Federal invader and to surrender the city.
Read More »

150 Years Ago This Week: Political issues

After months of siege operations at Petersburg, Lt. Gen. Ulysses Grant with Maj. Gen. George Meade and the Army of the Potomac became active again on Sunday, Feb. 5.
Read More »

Down Memory Lane for Feb. 12

By
0
Feb. 12

Jan. 9, 1975 The Rappahannock Medical Clinic opened Monday under the direction of Dr. Jerry Martin of Flint Hill and Dr. Werner Krebser of Huntly. The clinic is located in Washington, in a new brick building, which was designed for the specific needs of a clinic. The doctors have issued an invitation to the public...
Read More »

Washington column for Feb. 12

By
0
Feb. 12
From left, Louise Eastham, Rev. Jennings Hobson, Betty Buntin, Ruth Baumgardner and Lois Snead gathered Sunday afternoon to reminisce about life at Trinity Episcopal Church during the 1940s, ’50s and ’60s.

Trinity’s Forum What gorgeous weather we had on Sunday, I hoped that everyone got out and about and took advantage of it. People were out walking their dogs, jogging enjoying the beautiful weather. Just maybe spring is just around the corner for us. Members of Trinity church came out on Sunday afternoon for a...
Read More »

The Rapp for Feb. 5

With vocalist Tracy Walton and conductor Peter Jaffe, Paul Reisler and school kids perform last month with the Stockton Symphony in California.

The Inn’s looking for your snapshots from their first year (yes, 1978); Kid Pan Alley performs with a California symphony; the founders explain themselves on Presidents Day in Little Washington; Bel Canto auditions and more in this week’s The Rapp.
Read More »

150 Years Ago This Week: The peace conference

The three Confederate peace commissioners appointed on Jan. 28 by President Jefferson Davis: Vice President Alexander Stephens, Robert Hunter and John A. Campbell, received a pass issued by President Abraham Lincoln on Jan. 29 to allow them through U.S. military lines to Fortress Monroe, Va.
Read More »

Down Memory Lane for Feb. 5

By
0
Feb. 5

Nov. 28, 1974 A wing on the end of the house of Mr. and Mrs. I. L. Parrish near Viewtown burned Friday. Four rooms were gutted and smoke and water damage took their toll. A faulty electrical wire was believed to be the cause of the fire. Fortunately the family was home, discovered it soon...
Read More »

Is it Washington — or Little Washington?

Part of  Maj. Jedediah Hotchkiss’ 1862 map of the region.

There has been an enthusiastic online disagreement lately regarding the name of Little Washington, but it turns out the town officially known as Washington, Virginia, has been referred to as Little Washington on and off over the past 150 years or so.
Read More »

150 Years Ago This Week: ‘The alarming frequency of desertion’

Lt. Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest

To help mollify criticism in the Confederate States Congress of President Jefferson Davis’s handling of military affairs, the president signed into law on Monday, Jan. 23, an act providing for a General-in-Chief of the Confederate Armies.
Read More »

Down Memory Lane for Jan. 29

By
0
Jan. 29

Nov. 21, 1974 Skipper Giles rings up a sale, by hand crank, on his 1912 vintage cash register, at his Washington Cash Store. Giles has operated the Cash Store in Rappahannock county since 1936, but the big, ornate cash register has been in continuous operation at the store since the year it was made...
Read More »

150 Years Ago This Week: Major developments

The flamboyant career of a gallant, hard-fighting but often unsuccessful combat officer came to an inglorious end when Gen. John B. Hood, the commander of the Confederate Army of Tennessee, resigned the same day the Union assault on Ft. Fisher near Wilmington, N.C., began.
Read More »

Down Memory Lane for Jan. 22

By
0
Jan. 22

Sept. 26, 1974 “We’ve got a co-op that co-ops,”grinned Lucio Kilby, waving a hand that encompassed a beehive of activities at the apple packing shed at Sperryville. “All the other co-ops in Rappahannock didn’t co-ops, and now we’re the only big operation left.” A large packing shed at Flint Hill, and another one on...
Read More »

Abd el-Kader’s jihad of compassion and courage

By
4
Jan. 15
an-Baptist Huysmans’ painting of Abd el-Kader saving Christians during the Druze/Christian strife of 1860.

With radical Islam once again dominating the news, this time in France, it is important more than ever to know about the Islam of Emir Abd el-Kader al Jazairy, a great human being who was a Muslim and an Arab.
Read More »

150 Years Ago This Week: Gen. Butler is sacked

As the second week of January 1865 began, the general-in-chief of the U. S. Armies, Lt. Gen. Ulysses Grant, wired President Lincoln from his headquarters at Petersburg and asked the commander-in-chief to relieve Maj. Gen. Benjamin Butler.
Read More »

Down Memory Lane for Jan. 15 

By
0
Jan. 15

Aug. 22, 1974 A 450-pound bear was killed last week by Cliff Fincham at his home near Peola Mills, just over the line in Madison County. The bear killed eight shoats and three dogs before being downed with a shotgun. The bear attempted to climb a tree in the back yard and the dogs attacked...
Read More »

150 Years Ago This Week: Debate on abolition of slavery

On Sunday, the first day of the new year of 1865, on the James River in Virginia southeast of Richmond, Maj. Gen. Benjamin Butler, fresh from the debacle at Ft. Fisher, N.C., ordered a canal cut to bypass a large bend in the river at Dutch Gap.
Read More »

Down Memory Lane for Jan. 8

By
0
Jan. 8

Aug. 15, 1974 Peter Kramer, recently elected to the town council of Washington, was elected by his fellow members to the seat of vice mayor at the Tuesday evening meeting of the council. A proposal was made for the purchase of new street signs for the town and Mr. Kramer agreed to check on these....
Read More »

The Unpaved Roadshow: Hooked rugs, America’s indigenous folk art

Paying homage to a vital part of the early American lifestyle, this early 20th-century hooked rug features a pair of juxtaposed horse-head motifs featuring contrasting manes and detailed bridles. Simplistic lines and rustic details add to the traditional appeal of this American antique from the early 20th century. Courtesy Nazmiyal Collection.

Early American hooked rugs were originally a craft of poverty but by the 1930s were considered an art form and tell the evolution of the country.
Read More »

150 Years Ago This Week: Failure at Ft. Fisher

Maj. Gen. George Thomas, commander of the Union Army of the Cumberland in December 1864.

On Dec. 14, 1864, nearly 60 ships of the Union naval armada opened fire on Ft. Fisher, near Wilmington, N.C. Diversionary actions Gen. Benjamin Butler, leading the Union Army of the James, was a fiasco, leading to President Lincoln’s relieving the general of his command.
Read More »

Down Memory Lane for Dec. 31

Aug. 1, 1974 Joyce Ann Pullen of Washington, Va., declares that the next foggy morning she is going to stay home from her work at the Aileen plant near Flint Hill. For the second time since she has worked there she has encountered a deer in exactly the same location. The most recent was 6:30...
Read More »

150 Years Ago This Week: A Christmas gift for Lincoln

By
Dec. 25, 2014
150 Years Ago This Week: A Christmas gift for Lincoln

At Savannah, Ga., on Sunday, Dec. 18, 1864, Confederate Lt. Gen. William Hardee refused Maj. Gen. William Sherman’s demand to surrender the city, but it was clear that the city would have to be evacuated by the Confederates before their one route of escape to the north would be closed by the Union troops.
Read More »

150 Years Ago This Week: Battle of Nashville

By
Dec. 18, 2014

In mid-December 1864, the Civil War ends in the west with a decisive battle at Nashville, while in Savannah, Gen. Sherman demands the surrender of the city from Confederate Gen. Hardee, in this week’s 150 Years Ago.
Read More »

Down Memory Lane for Dec. 18

By
Dec. 18, 2014

July 25, 1974 The Town of Washington will be 225 years old on Sunday, Aug. 4, according to the Virginia Conservation Marker. A town meeting on the courthouse lawn at 7:30 p.m. with refreshments will commemorate the occasion. Honored guests at the meeting will be local residents who are descendants of George Washington, the...
Read More »

The telling bell

Courtesy photo

150 Years Ago This Week: The burning in Loudoun County

By
Dec. 11, 2014

Winter did not impede military operations in December 1864, while, in Washington, Congress was about to consider the thorny issues of reconstruction and abolishing slavery.
Read More »

Down Memory Lane for Dec. 11

By
Dec. 11, 2014

July 18, 1974 A sudden wind storm last Wednesday evening tossed and twirled tree limbs, porch furniture and TV antennas in the Washington area. Hail pelted the town, electricity failed in some places and trees were uprooted. Mrs. Bobbi Critzer was hard hit, and she said she expected the house to go any minute in...
Read More »

150 Years Ago This Week: A dark day in American history 

By
Dec. 4, 2014

On Nov. 1864, Union and Confederate ships were destroyed, fighting continued in Tennessee and the Mid-Atlantic, and Federal troops massacred Indians in New Mexico territory.
Read More »

Down Memory Lane for Dec. 4

By
Dec. 4, 2014

July 11, 1974 The Rev. B. Gale Titchenell of Woodville, an 11th- and 12th-grade government and U.S. history teacher and chairman of the social studies department at Rappahannock County High School, is among 76 teachers attending a graduate course on “preservation of the Principles of Freedom” at the national headquarters of Freedoms Foundation at...
Read More »

150 Years Ago This Week: The men who tried to burn New York

By
Nov. 27, 2014
Harper’s Weekly (Dec. 17, 1864) depicted a Confederate agent setting a fire in Room 108 of the Tammany Hotel, one of many venues targeted for arson by the Confederates on Nov. 25.

In late November, Sherman’s army continued to burn and loot its way through the South and arsonists hired by Confederate agents set fire to multiple venues in New York, while the Booths were onstage together for the first time in “Julius Caesar.”
Read More »

Down Memory Lane for Nov. 27

By
Nov. 27, 2014

July 4, 1974 Cotton Miller just hung out her shingle last month, but she’s been busy doing picture framing, flower drying and decoupage were more than 10 years. One room in her basement workshop is full of the things she’s done, dried flower arrangements pressed under glass against a velvet background, bright colored tole paintings...
Read More »

Telling stories of her ancestors’ stand against Civil War savagery  

By
Nov. 20, 2014
beachyWide-20

Kirsten Eve Beachy tells the stories of Brethren and Mennonite women in the Shenandoah Valley during the Civil War.
Read More »

150 Years Ago This Week: March to the sea, and eloquence misplaced

By
Nov. 20, 2014
Alexander Hay Ritchie engraving via U.S. Library of Congress

On Monday, Nov. 14, 1864, Maj. Gen. William Sherman and his 62,000 men were in and around Atlanta, preparing to depart for the Atlantic coast, while the cavalry was already on the move.
Read More »

Down Memory Lane for Nov. 20

By
Nov. 20, 2014

June 27, 1974 Ian Pryde of Washington, Pat Biggs, Flint Hill, and Jack Atkins, Amissville, have completed a 40-hour instructor’s EMT (Emergency Medical Technician) course at Lord Fairfax Community College, Middletown. They are among the approximately 25 people in Virginia qualified to teach the EMT courses. They, along with about 10 other county residents, had previously...
Read More »

In memorium

By
Nov. 13, 2014
By Cathie Shiff

150 Years Ago This Week: Lincoln re-elected

By
Nov. 13, 2014
150 Years Ago This Week

This week 150 years ago, Abraham Lincoln was re-elected president of the United States, with Andrew Johnson of Tennessee as vice president, while the Second Congress of the Confederate States met in Richmond for what was destined to be the last time.
Read More »

Letter: But who ratified the Constitution?  

I enjoyed your long article of Oct. 30 about the James Madison vs. James Monroe election for a seat in the United States House of Representatives in 1789. However, the author of the article is in error in twice stating that in Virginia the United States Constitution was ratified in 1788 by the Virginia...
Read More »

 
 

Recent Comments



Photo/Video/Audio